Category Archives: Language acquisition

How to teach kids a foreign language


0_tittle

Start Simple

Start with greetings and common phrases (hello, how are you, etc.) and the most common words (ball, milk, cat, dog, daddy, mommy)

1
Offer Rewards

Increase their motivation by rewarding them for learning extra words or phrases (e.g. , icecream, a chocolate bar, a trip to his/her favorite place, such as an amusement park).

2
Have Surprises

Surprises are proven to increase motivation. Play games like hide and seek (count in the 2nd language) or peekaboo (for babies).

3
Make it fun

Make the activities fun by playing language games or going on to field trips. You can go to the zoo and name the animals in the 2nd language or play snakes and ladders.

5
Short and simple

Children will lose interest if the task their given is difficult.Ask them to learn only a few words at a time, they will find the task more enjoyable and increase their confidence.

6
Monitor Progress

Continuously test your child’s knowledge. Instead of a written test you can use worksheets or just ask simple questions like show me your “はな”(nose) or give me the ”ボール。”

7
Set Clear goals

Have a clear goals about your target for the end of the year. Do you want to teach a) greetings and basics b) conversational competence, c) reading and writing skill, d) native level competence, e) etc..

8
Combine digital and traditional materials

Applications and language DVDs are good but also use traditional hands on materials such as flashcards and picture dictionaries.

9
Use your connections

Ask grandparents, neighbors and relatives if its OK to have a skype chat with them. Also you can join facebook groups, online forums etc. to connect with likeminded people.

10
Teachers

Let your child’s kindergarten teacher or caregiver know about your aim of raising a bilingual child. They will make sure your child does not experience any problems among his/her peers.

11

by http://dinolingo.com/jp/

INFOGRAPHIC Most Spoken Languages on TWITTER


Our research shows that

English is the most used language on Twitter. (However, this is lower than the popularity of English on other platforms: e.g.  more than 50% of websites all around the world are in English) 

Japanese is the 2nd most popular language on Twitter despite the fact that it is the 9th most spoken in the world.

Saudi Arabia has the highest percentage of online population using Twitter. 

dinograph

Infographic here a (1)

Can Language DVDs teach Babies? Do Infant-Directed DVDs Work? A Closer look at Baby Vocabulary and Baby Media


The short answer is yes, simply because language DVDs make babies process audio information coupled with visual information either passively or actively. This process in turn influences the phoneme differentiation (which naturally deteriorates after 8 months of age) and increases familiarity with different sounds. When children pay attention to the material, they acquire receptive or expressive vocabulary easily as explained below. If they don’t pay attention to the program, they still can improve since studies show that even background TV does improve vocabulary (Robb et al., 2009).

Perhaps the earliest proponents of vocabulary learning from children’s programming were Rice, Huston, Truglio and Wright (1990) who found that children aged between 3-5 improved their vocabulary significantly after constantly watching Sesame Street for 2 years. Furthermore, Linebarger and Walker (2005) observed that babies aged around 30 months were able to express a higher number of words after being exposed to educational TV shows like Dragon Tales, etc. More recently, Dr. Krcmar and her colleagues(2007)  found that televised instruction can teach babies new words although it might not be as effective as live instruction.  In 2008, Carlson and Strattman reported that babies who watched vocabulary DVDs scored higher than babies in the control group. Lastly, Dr. Krcmar’s student Amy Rush had demonstrated that babies aged 4-24 months can learn new novel words from infant-directed DVDs.

There are a few studies which found insignificant effects of DVD exposure and vocabulary learning. However, most of these studies used Baby Einstein WordsWorth videos which are not necessarily produced by scientific guidelines. Additionally, these studies failed to provide a theoretical explanation why audio-visual exposure is inferior to zero exposure even though it is scientifically proven that babies are extremely sensitive to sounds in their immediate environment.

Here are  the studies cited

Carlson, T.  & Strattman, K. (2008). Do Babies Increase Vocabulary by Viewing Baby Media? Paper Presented at the Proceedings of the 4th Annual GRASP Symposium, Wichita State University.

Linebarger, D. L., & Walker, D. (2005). Infants‟ and toddlers‟ television viewing and language outcomes. American Behavioral Scientist, 48(5), 624-645

Krcmar, M., Grela, B., and K. Lin (2007). Can Toddlers Learn Vocabulary from Television? An Experimental Approach, Media Psychology 10, 41-63.

Rice, M. L., Huston, A. C., Truglio, R., & Wright, L. C. (1990).  Words from Sesame Street: Learning vocabulary while viewing. Developmental Psychology, 26, 421-428.

Robb, M., Richert, R., & Wartella, E. (2009). Just a talking book? Word learning from watching baby videos. British Journal of Developmental Psychology, 27, 27–45.

Rush, Amy (2011).Can toddlers learn novel words from educational videos? A study using repeat exposure to assess infant’s use and understanding of television. Unpublished Master’s Thesis. Wake Forest University, NC.

Here’s the abstract of Amy Rush’s Thesis

“”The current study employed a mixed design to assess word learning in infants under the age of two. Four conditions were used to see if babies who watched an infant-directed DVD at least six times over two weeks, or who watched an infant-directed DVD with parental mediation at least six times over two weeks, learned more novel words from the DVD than infants in the control condition. The current study was unique in three ways. The present study used a DVD very similar to an actual Baby Einstein DVD and the study used repeat exposure to explore whether showing the same DVD to a child multiple times could increase word learning. Finally, this study sought to determine if parent mediation could enhance children’s viewing experiences. Results suggested that repeated exposure to the DVD did have a significant impact on word learning for infants aged four months to twenty-four months compared to children who had not seen the DVD. Results also showed that while the interaction between age and condition was not significant, the means were in the predicted direction and thus infants aged eighteen to twenty-four months did learn more novel words than the younger infants. Lastly, results showed that children in the treatment group with mediation did learn more novel words than children whose parents did not provide mediation of the DVD for them; however, the effect for word learning was not significant.””

Germen lessons for kids

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Do children learn languages faster than adults?


At Dino Lingo we get this question quite often…

Contrary to the common belief, children cannot acquire foreign languages in shorter time span compared with older learners. This is just a myth since most people compare kids from immigrant families with their parents without keeping in mind that these children experience higher level of foreign language exposure and go through intense formal education in the second language. Despite the earlier views about younger is the better, now many academicians seem to agree that older learners outperform children in terms of verbal analytical tasks and sophisticated use of language (Collier, 1989; Bialystok & Hakuta, 1994; Bongaerts et al., 1997).

“A common assumption is that “young children pick up a second language so fast.” What is not often taken into account by the layperson is the vast difference in the level of language complexity expected for each age. Children’s second language acquisition appears superior largely because the structures and vocabulary they need for adequate communication are so much simpler than those required of adults. In addition, children at age 6 have not yet begun to complete full cognitive development in their first language. Young children can be outperformed by older subjects on similar tasks in the second language because of the latter group’s greater cognitive maturity and the knowledge or life experience that transfers from the first to the second language. This is even more clearly demonstrated in the following summary of studies focusing on acquisition of context-reduced, cognitively demanding aspects of oral and written school language.” (Excerpt from Collier, 1989)

HOWEVER, there`s a critical period of foreign language acquisition peaking around age 6 and ending by the age of 12 (Pennfield and Roberts, 1959 ; Lenneberg, 1967): children are way better than adults when it comes to pronunciation and oral performance which are attributed to muscular plasticity and cerebral plasticity that naturally diminish by aging (Scovel, 1988).


Neuromuscular Control: From the phonological perspective, the sounds produced by each speaker are heavily influenced by neuromuscular coordination in the oral region. Since young learners (especially children aged 1-6) have no established articulation patterns, uttering any sound or word is way easier for them compared with adults.

FREE ENGLİSH FLASH CARDS FROM DINO LINGO

FREE ENGLISH FLASH CARDS FROM DINO LINGO

Brain Plasticity: Scovel (1988) argues that lateralization of brain functions and the loss of neural plasticity before puberty –around age 12– marks the end of first language development (except vocabulary). Although there is still an ongoing debate in this area, it is proposed that lack of plasticity in the brain hinders new language acquisition because after this period language processing capacity cannot increase, L1 and L2 would be managed in different regions of the brain and higher levels of myelination becomes an impeding factor.

Some people also propose that soft palate size during early childhood, the strength of receptive memory for new words in L1 between ages 2-9 and children`s sensitivity towards different sounds (e.g. recognizing the difference between English r, French r and Arabic r) make children better learners of foreign languages. However, so far, none of these hypotheses are scientifically tested.

Ellen Bialystok from York university explains the difference between adults and children with the shift in phonemic categorization strategies after age 5. Before the age of 5 children can establish new sound categories when they hear a new sound but later they just extend the categories they know. Bialystok (2001) also notes that adults don’t necessarily have poor cognitive skills but, aged individuals rely more on established schemes that make harder to acquire new information. The conclusion: young children are better in sound recognition and pronunciation but when it comes to learning a whole language, it is a totally different story.

References
Scovel, Thomas. 1988. A time to speak: a psycholinguistic inquiry into the critical period for
human speech. Rowley, MA: Newbury House.
Penfield, W. & Roberts, L. (1959). Speech and brain mechanisms. Princeton, NJ:
Princeton University Press.
Lenneberg, Eric. 1967. Biological foundations of language. New York, NY: Wiley.
Bialystock, E. & Hakuta, K. (1994) In Other Words: The Science and Psychology of Second-Language Acquisition. New York, NY: Basic Books
Bongaerts, T., Summeren, C., Planken, B., & Schils, E. (1997). Age and ultimate attainment in the pronunciation of a foreign language. Studies in Second Language Acquisition, 19, 447–466.
Collier, V.P. (1989). How long? A synthesis of research on academic achievement in a second language. TESOL Quarterly, 23, 509-531.

FREE ENGLİSH FLASH CARDS FROM DINO LINGO

FREE ENGLISH FLASH CARDS FROM DINO LINGO

Some Other Helpful Resources
http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~guion/440notes/LearnerCharacteristics.htm

http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/~skang/371/DownloadablePapers/BongaertsEtAl97.pdf

http://www.psy.cmu.edu/~siegler/JohnsnNewprt89.pdf

http://www.ling.upenn.edu/courses/Fall_2003/ling001/phonology.html

http://www.newsweek.com/1997/02/28/the-language-explosion.html

http://home.pufs.ac.kr/~yslee/research/papers/35PronunDifficulty.pdf

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090910084303.htm

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

DL contractor info-form


Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Xpress language learning Set


XPRESS LANGUAGE SETS

Please fill the form below in order to receive “NEW RELEASE” alerts, discount coupons & promo codes from Dino Lingo.

You will receive an email from us AS SOON AS we release the “XPRESS SET” in your language, That email will include an additional 10% discount coupon.

All new announcements are made on our Facebook page, so make sure to Like Dino Lingo on facebook to stay in the loop! Facebook here

———–

We promise never to share, trade, sell, deliver or out your email address in any way, shape, or form. We also assure you that you will not be sent any newsletters or weekly/monthly updates unless you specifically request them.

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Cool ESL Songs for Kids


Learn English With Songs

Rewardi

View More by this ArtistTo preview a song, mouse over the title and click Play. Open iTunes to buy and download music.

Name Artist Time Price
1 Shapes – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 1:40 $0.99 View In iTunes
2 Verbs – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 3:16 $0.99 View In iTunes
3 Food – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 2:28 $0.99 View In iTunes
4 Numbers – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 1:52 $0.99 View In iTunes
5 Family – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 2:30 $0.99 View In iTunes
6 Alphabet – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 2:44 $0.99 View In iTunes
7 Colors – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 2:38 $0.99 View In iTunes
8 Head Shoulders – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 2:09 $0.99 View In iTunes
9 Days – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 1:37 $0.99 View In iTunes
10 Months – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 1:37 $0.99 View In iTunes
11 Greetings – Study & Learn English (ESL) Rewardi 2:04 $0.99 View In iTunes
Total: 11 Songs

Customer Reviews

fun songs for my 4 yr old

by USAmommyI have a 4 year old son and every morning I drive him to daycare, and this CD is one of the few albums that he loves to listen in the car. The other morning I heard him repeating the names of the months like the “Months” song. It was amazing.
p.s. the length of the CD is totally fine, if they release another album I would definitely get it. I recommend this to everybody.

…More

Great album for students

by English Teacher1I am an English teacher and we listen this album in the school very often. Students love it too, I would really appreciate it if there were more albums like this one. Thanks. I recommend to all students.

Top Albums and Songs by Rewardi

Name Album Time Price
1 Shapes – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 1:40 $0.99 View In iTunes
2 Verbs – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 3:16 $0.99 View In iTunes
3 Food – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 2:28 $0.99 View In iTunes
4 Numbers – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 1:52 $0.99 View In iTunes
5 Family – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 2:30 $0.99 View In iTunes
6 Alphabet – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 2:44 $0.99 View In iTunes
7 Colors – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 2:38 $0.99 View In iTunes
8 Head Shoulders – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 2:09 $0.99 View In iTunes
9 Days – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 1:37 $0.99 View In iTunes
10 Months – Study & Learn English (ESL) Learn English With Songs 1:37 $0.99 View In iTunes
Learn English With Songs, Rewardi

View In iTunes

Customer Ratings

We have not received enough ratings to display an average for this album.

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

Visit Dino Lingo to learn more about available language learning programs for your child!

%d bloggers like this: